When Jack Ruby threatened to kill Lee Harvey Oswald, documents show

July 13, 1965: A police car is burned while Jack Ruby holds a .38 caliber revolver and threatens to kill Lee Harvey Oswald and any witnesses on the scene. The incident is eventually cleared…

When Jack Ruby threatened to kill Lee Harvey Oswald, documents show

July 13, 1965: A police car is burned while Jack Ruby holds a .38 caliber revolver and threatens to kill Lee Harvey Oswald and any witnesses on the scene. The incident is eventually cleared of any link to the assassination of Malcolm X. Files include police files, media accounts and arrest and court documents.

Law enforcement officials frequently attributed the fire on the police car to a dirty bomb attack on the “confidential” vehicle that had been in an FBI stationary car in which Lee Harvey Oswald’s widow ( Marina Oswald Schultz) had been parked outside the Village theater where she heard a voice say “Shovel,” a reference to the car Oswald, a former New Orleans policeman, had driven to the Dallas Police Headquarters two days earlier before being shot dead by police.

Nixon administration and FBI official John Ehrlichman was under investigation for extortion and files were withheld.

August 5, 1966: Prosecutors investigating the assassination of Sen. Robert F. Kennedy through FBI, CIA and other investigations obtained and released a record of hundreds of wiretaps and were told by the Intelligence Council that tapping of telephone conversations and other surveillance techniques had been used to check Oswald’s involvement.

September 3, 1967: John F. Kennedy and the only surviving sister, Jean Kennedy Smith, considered a possible witness, testifies before the Senate Church Committee investigating CIA-sponsored overthrows of governments. She accuses the former president of ordering the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. The committee declines to take action against Kennedy.

August 30, 1969: A one-man jury acquitted a Vietnamese immigrant of a manslaughter charge in the killing of Malcolm X, a trial that was closely watched in the country. Jamaican-born W.W. Hoyt was sentenced to one year in jail for conspiracy to break into the hospital room of the late Nation of Islam leader on June 13, 1965, to see if he would stop a telecast that questioned the stability of the country and the validity of its draft.

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