What is the United States’ most popular meat?

Written by By D, a I am vegan, but I am definitely not vegetarian. If I’m having an old friend over for a glass of wine, or we’re watching a movie on Netflix or…

Written by By D, a

I am vegan, but I am definitely not vegetarian.

If I’m having an old friend over for a glass of wine, or we’re watching a movie on Netflix or even just a Netflix segment on cooking on an outdoor grill, I eat beef.

When I was growing up, I had two healthy eating habits: 1) Eating meat on Fridays, and 2) I would wake up early on Sunday mornings and prepare plant-based alternatives to meat. But as I grew older, I found that eating vegetarian on the weekends was perfectly healthy and was just as satisfying.

So on one hand, I don’t need to choose between veganism and healthy eating, and when I have friends over, I feel like an indulgent host. On the other hand, sometimes it’s easier to eat a Big Mac than to let go of something that has been part of your life for decades. I’m not the only one. According to a recent Pew Research Center study, 22% of adults today identify as vegetarian or vegan, a significant increase from 5% in 1970.

That said, the increased popularity of vegetarian and vegan diets is not something that’s limited to just millennials. According to the Agriculture and Trade Information Service, people living in the Millennial age group (ages 18-35) accounted for 63% of the U.S. increase in vegetarian/vegan meat sales. The USDA predicts continued growth for this group, with 18% of all U.S. adults identifying as vegetarian or vegan by 2030.

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