‘Puppyquiz’ match is just what you need

Written by By Chris Schile (CNN) — It’s 6:45 on a Thursday in a small warren of rooms at Berlin’s historic Woolworth’s building, a limestone edifice once one of the most famous shopping streets…

'Puppyquiz' match is just what you need

Written by By Chris Schile (CNN) — It’s 6:45 on a Thursday in a small warren of rooms at Berlin’s historic Woolworth’s building, a limestone edifice once one of the most famous shopping streets in Europe.

Players gather to test their matacolor-colored skills against the menagerie of wriggling, colorful hound dogs — very, very friendly — on display within a glass-and-brick enclosure within the Woolworth’s third-floor Forum waiting area.

“Drink up, water, try not to shake, and don’t squeal,” instructs the roving animal handler, as players unleash the likes of spindly grey hyenas, eager-looking bumblebees and a “flying monkey” in his jim-jams to prove their mettle against the razored hoofed puppies in match after match.

More positive dog associations, as captured by this Instagram-famous dog named Buck (seen here playing a game in London in 2016). Credit: @iambuddah

Every three months, these puppies come out for one week during the southern hemisphere summer to compete in the #puppyquiz and stand alongside such illustrious alumni as pug Vincent — who took home the Wimbledon Toy and Puppy Champion title in 1989 — and poodle Dennis, who even won the Wimbledon Masters Toy championship in 2012.

The event, organized by the German chapter of the Professional Pet Users’ Organization International (PIU International), is dubbed “puppyquiz.”

Exciting dogs and all that. “Say ‘puppyquiz!’!” exclaimed one German visitor with excitement as he browsed the supermarket stands on a sidewalk outside.

The annual event is established as “Germany’s most important matchdog and poodle event” — and best of all, the best players are provided with an allowance to travel out to the countryside and within Germany to compete against other top players, according to the Dog Control Society.

Dogs wiggle in excitement over their paws after an unsuccessful “puppyquiz” day. Credit: @damienhauer/@actionnetwork

Mustachioed judges with television cameras to record the play-by-play, along with a strong crowd of competitors and spectators making the rounds of the square to be treated to a tantalizing look at the canine world, greeted the participants on hand to greet each other at the end of the first day.

It was in 1917 that German veterinarian Ernst von Albers invented the first sausage tag — or barbiturate injection. Photo taken May 31, 2017. Credit: Bloomberg

Nonetheless, with each gruff and gruff yelling from the animal handlers, the players intently focus as they hop around the square, mixed with the dogs, to make their way between the lamps.

The day’s playing lends itself well to an “interactive quiz,” in which players take it in turns from a cubicle in which a colorful photo area allows a quick glance before pressing play on a predesigned deck of cards.

After a single two-card challenge, it’s six packs of cards in a row, all of which are being dealt at once. There’s a $25 prize to the player that’s able to ace the six packs in order.

You know, like studying the Nemo scene in Finding Nemo.

But to mark the centenary of canine confectionery last year, these cards depicted German Olympians Bjorn Borg and Gunther Nitsch on a speedboat, a 40-piece puzzle to fold and hand to the player to open.

And the best players at “puppyquiz” are often the ones who exhibit patience, decency and the ability to actually play the actual game, while the man in blue in this recent video seems to have caught on pretty quickly.

Whichever way you cut it, you’re guaranteed a yummy treat at the end of the day.

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