How Brits are turning off a holiday leader like no other

Pace the new U.S. President Donald Trump. Being snubbed by Simon Cowell was bad enough. Britain’s own Theresa May has for much of the past year been facing a vociferous and growing campaign from…

How Brits are turning off a holiday leader like no other

Pace the new U.S. President Donald Trump. Being snubbed by Simon Cowell was bad enough. Britain’s own Theresa May has for much of the past year been facing a vociferous and growing campaign from an eclectic assortment of prominent Britons to replace her. (It’s less a question of her doing well in her job and more a matter of her being not doing well enough.) On the plus side, the moment of her resignation was, predictably, not her best, which was rather unlucky given her shadow’s fall. Not that it’s helped anything.

Tourism is tanking…even though May and Trump will be meeting in person soon. pic.twitter.com/Xf5x6tXZes — Simon Cullen (@scullenmiss) April 4, 2018

As the BBC points out, this has happened just as the prime minister is set to meet the president in the U.S. after her disastrous snap election. May used this election to toughen up her Brexit negotiating stance by firming up an agreement in principle to pull Britain out of the single market and customs union. The Trump-May meeting, sure to have some attention for much of the week due to the deployment of missile defenses near the Korean peninsula, will likely inject some Brexit twists into an event that has already been given added spice by the new U.S. missile test and speculation about Kim Jong Un’s intention of launching a nuclear attack on Guam.

Tourism (not least business travel) accounts for 12% of the British economy.

Related: Trump gets annoyed: GOP ad called him ‘uninformed’ about immigration gets pulled

“They are such major figures that their actions have a real effect,” Jochen Vogel, the chief of the German tourism agency Destatis, told the BBC.

The Brexit hole won’t be plugged easily. On Brexit day, 2019, the pound will no longer be the world’s reserve currency. The City of London’s merchant banking sector will be lost. It will take years, not months, for the UK to regroup and rebrand in the Europe it still owns.

Latest News from The Atlantic

Read more of the latest news from The Atlantic.

More From The Atlantic:

What’s the Agency We Should Put on Charges of Murder?

No, Trump’s New Weapon Isn’t Effective or Smart

Why Western Diplomacy Failed Assad

Leave a Comment