Here’s why monkeypox is a bigger problem in Africa than here

A monkeypox case in Maryland has been confirmed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Dr. Anne Schuchat, CDC principal deputy director, said at a press conference on Friday. The individual…

Here's why monkeypox is a bigger problem in Africa than here

A monkeypox case in Maryland has been confirmed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Dr. Anne Schuchat, CDC principal deputy director, said at a press conference on Friday. The individual has recovered and was not hospitalized, Schuchat said.

Monkeypox is similar to Ebola, but in monkeys, and therefore cannot be transmitted to humans, Schuchat explained. But Ebola remains a public health concern and should be considered when considering transmission to people, she said.

Monkeypox was first identified in 2010, according to CDC. As of Friday, 1,500 cases of Monkeypox have been identified and 316 people have been diagnosed, but only one person has died from it, Schuchat said.

“Our goal is to eliminate this illness completely, so all monkeypox infections we’re seeing now are related to an imported case. Monkeypox outbreaks naturally occur in Central and West Africa,” Schuchat said.

She said cases of Monkeypox were likely to continue in the United States for the next two years.

The CDC does not have enough funding to control the outbreaks, Schuchat said.

The CDC does have an analysis of animal pathogenic diseases, which are diseases that have been introduced into a country by natural process or through people or animal vectors, according to Schuchat. The CDC is studying the Monkeypox cases to determine which animals to control or eradicate in the U.S.

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