Greta: Jurors Begin Deliberations in Etan Patz Kidnapping Trial

Jurors are expected to resume deliberations Monday afternoon in the trial of Pedro Hernandez, the man accused of kidnapping 6-year-old Etan Patz in 1979. The Patz case has remained one of the most notorious…

Greta: Jurors Begin Deliberations in Etan Patz Kidnapping Trial

Jurors are expected to resume deliberations Monday afternoon in the trial of Pedro Hernandez, the man accused of kidnapping 6-year-old Etan Patz in 1979. The Patz case has remained one of the most notorious in New York City history. Hernandez has admitted to choking Patz before leaving his body in a garbage bag and box in a New York City alley.

Prosecutors on Thursday laid out a complicated argument about how Hernandez could have gotten rid of evidence after the murder, going over everything from a hidden basement bench to a crate in a loft where Hernandez lived.

Jurors are also looking at the idea that authorities failed to search Hernandez’s freezer for evidence immediately after the killing.

Carlos Lopez, a longtime Patz family friend, testified that Hernandez loved Etan Patz and kept the boy close to him, and that Hernandez wanted to be famous. Lopez also said Hernandez had hinted that he was involved in the Patz case. He said Hernandez said he wanted to get the police to look into the case, and had a strategy for getting out of the cold case.

Patz was one of the first missing children nationally to appear on milk cartons in an effort to raise public awareness. He disappeared on May 25, 1979, walking alone for the first time to a school bus stop in SoHo, one of Manhattan’s fashionable neighborhoods.

Hernandez told police in 2012 that he had lured Patz into a store basement with the promise of a soda, strangled him and put him in a box before walking home to the SoHo apartment he shared with his brother, and leaving the body in a garbage bag and box in a nearby alley.

Hernandez was arrested in 2012, but he has never admitted to the crime. He said he lured Patz into the basement because he thought he was a boy who looked like a boy who had come to the convenience store where he worked as a stock clerk.

A lawyer for Hernandez acknowledged that Hernandez had mentioned the case, but said he didn’t know it involved Patz.

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