Cops may start stopping teenagers for possessing assault rifles. Here’s the solution for parents of teenage boys

This story originally appeared on Punchfork.org, a social justice education and engagement platform that is part of the Washington Post’s journalism initiative. You are your son’s babysitter. The last paycheck is in the mail….

Cops may start stopping teenagers for possessing assault rifles. Here’s the solution for parents of teenage boys

This story originally appeared on Punchfork.org, a social justice education and engagement platform that is part of the Washington Post’s journalism initiative.

You are your son’s babysitter. The last paycheck is in the mail. You’re spending every cent on groceries. And he doesn’t care.

You don’t have to ask his permission to give him a bath. You don’t have to ask him if he’s ready for a trip to the store. Because he is your son.

But asking him to stop watching sports on TV and start playing Minecraft, to turn off the computer, to text his girlfriend instead of bombarding his aunt with photos of his fancy spring break with Rico Grande and the rest of the high school Panthers, to take a step back from Pokémon Go on your lap and think about the world outside that is an enormous curveball, is just asking him to stop acting like a child and start learning the world is not a screen — even if he is now a teenager.

What have you done, Lori? And how will you get out of your identity as a homemaker? Are you going to ask you husband? Are you going to ask your sisters?

You have no answers.

You look at your son as you try to see him now.

She Wrote About the Family Babysitter by Stephanie Wolf | Washington Post

You are your son’s babysitter. The last paycheck is in the mail. You’re spending every cent on groceries. And he doesn’t care.

You don’t have to ask his permission to give him a bath. You don’t have to ask him if he’s ready for a trip to the store. Because he is your son.

But asking him to stop watching sports on TV and start playing Minecraft, to turn off the computer, to text his girlfriend instead of bombarding his aunt with photos of his fancy spring break with Rico Grande and the rest of the high school Panthers, to take a step back from Pokémon Go on your lap and think about the world outside that is an enormous curveball, is just asking him to stop acting like a child and start learning the world is not a screen — even if he is now a teenager.

Who will be his boss when he’s 18, you wonder. Can he kick the football when you’re not around? Hold down a job while waiting tables? Tell you his opinion when you’re babysitting? Does he really need all the gadgets?

But who needs games? Who needs the screen? People who need their parents most of all.

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