Artists, critics and thinkers discuss culture of New York’s 1789 revolt

This first programme of activities and events, inspired by the book Localism: Becoming Socially and Economically Independent in Contemporary America, looks at the history of New York through its many artistic movements New York…

Artists, critics and thinkers discuss culture of New York's 1789 revolt

This first programme of activities and events, inspired by the book Localism: Becoming Socially and Economically Independent in Contemporary America, looks at the history of New York through its many artistic movements

New York City was, in the early 19th century, the world’s leading cultural centre. Some of the most famous composers and painters worked here, as did icons of popular art such as Thomas Hart Benton and Washington Irving. Until its financial collapse in 1871, the city was much admired for its literary, artistic and artistic ventures.

As the 19th century wore on, the city’s creative scene became more varied. Artists such as Johannes Vermeer, Paul Cézanne and Ernst Ludwig Kirchner turned their guns on the city, developing innovative techniques for capturing the powerful, the beautiful and the everyday. Others, such as Ngaio Marsh, painted vividly nostalgic scenes of New York’s individual neighbourhoods, each with its own distinctive flavour. Though New York became a bit of a wasteland, its residents managed to bounce back, and culture flourished again.

This programme of activities and events, inspired by the book Localism: Becoming Socially and Economically Independent in Contemporary America, will take place between 18-21 November. All events are free. For more information and updates visit www.cityarts.org

Photograph: Richard Josephs of New York City’s Public Art Fund

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