Airways 2025: How space planes could fight business-class fatigue

The upper echelons of air travel are already starting to look very different – because of the rise of super-venture, low-fare, business-driven airlines. Now, you’ll soon be flying under the wings of supercomputers, too….

Airways 2025: How space planes could fight business-class fatigue

The upper echelons of air travel are already starting to look very different – because of the rise of super-venture, low-fare, business-driven airlines. Now, you’ll soon be flying under the wings of supercomputers, too. “In the future, jets may be not only business jets and passenger planes, but also flying behemoth computer systems,” says Lucy Stoddart, who analyses the aviation industry for Flight International. She’s talking about high-altitude airships that can carry a million-dollar data package, known as a SimSat, far above the clouds. The plane is operated by way of a databus that feeds information to the data-driven module on board. SimSats can complete the task in 100 minutes, compared with the decades it might take for an airline computer to “programme” all the data they might want to access. And they don’t have to be big – just 1-million-pound Gigawatt Palaeobots would fit to fit in the hangar of a Boeing 747, packed with a total of four memory storage devices. What are SimSats like? If you’ve flown on an internal flight with Ryanair, then you may have noticed that the flight attendant never struts back and forth the floor and makes announcements. If they’d been talking down to you, you’d have raised your hand. Likewise, the communications from the flight deck to the cabin have generally been top-down, rather than down.

Now one space consortium, the Aeronautical Hypersonic System (AHS), is looking to increase that direct-to-customer communication. The group includes NASA, Lockheed Martin, United Technologies Aerospace Systems and Airbus. Other members include Boeing and Qualcomm, as well as UC Berkeley and MIT.

What is your company planning? As well as networking SimSat systems, the consortium is pursuing technology to boost the range of long-range civilian jetliners by 80 percent by “fusing” aircraft with space shuttles, to reduce their journey times from four hours and 40 minutes to just over an hour. Test flights for the Pasadena to Las Vegas flight route in 2020 will follow.

Which will be more sustainable? Passengers flying around the globe on mini-submarines could well be living on superdata satellites themselves, rather than shrinking-fry boxes of radio or satellite-telephone signals. AHS researchers aim to have networks up and running in 20 years time. “Think of the effect that might have on the exorbitant cost of air travel,” says Stoddart.

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Why superbusiness minisuites are the future of flying Charlie Webster explains https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/sky-tix-84119148 Charlie Webster explains What is your company planning? As well as networking SimSat systems, the consortium is pursuing technology to boost the range of long-range civilian jetliners by 80 percent by “fusing” aircraft with space shuttles, to reduce their journey times from four hours and 40 minutes to just over an hour. Test flights for the Pasadena to Las Vegas flight route in 2020 will follow.What are your thoughts? In October, the world’s airlines will get together in Chicago for the annual general meeting of the International Air Transport Association. What will come up for discussion? Rather than squeezing business class bargain basement rates into economy (or vice versa), the key discussions will be: how can the world’s airlines solve the “business” part of the equation – and can they, in the meantime, keep the masses happy for their growing presence in every major city across the globe?

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